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494
THE IRON INDUSTRY.
TABLE XXII-S. Steel Plants in Southeastern Pennsylvania.
	Location.	Open Hearth Furnaces and Capacity.	Tropenas, Converters and Capacity.
Steel Works with Rolling Mills : Lukens		(6-40	
Pencoyd .    .     .                      , .	Philadelphia.	16-50 10-30	
		I4r40	
Phoenix ........... ........................	Phoanixville.		
Worth Brothers    ....            . .      . .	Coatesville. . .	6-35	
Tidewater		3-50	
Midvale..         .	Philadelphia.	?	
			
		(2-20	
Penn Steel		|3-12 3-25	
Solid		2-20	
Seaboard .................................	Chester ....	2-20 1-20	
Norristown ............................... Wharton ........................... . ......	Norristown Philadelphia.	2-15	1-2
Brygton ............      . .     ......	Reading ......		2-2
Logan. .   .			2-2
		1	
SEC. XXIIm.ŚNew Jersey, New York and New England: On the shores of Lake Champlain and in the northern basin of the Hudson Eiver there are considerable deposits of magnetite, which played an important part in the early history of the American iron industry, being the base of supplies for the Bessemer plant formerly operated at Troy, N. Y. It was necessary to transport either coke or anthracite coal from Pennsylvania, and with the advent of cheap Lake Superior ores the manufacture of steel at this point was abandoned many years ago. An attempt was made in recent years to operate a basic Bessemer plant, but the conditions were not such as to warrant a continuance of the operations. This line of magnetic deposits extends southwesterly across the northern portion of New Jersey into Pennsylvania, where it appears as the Cornwall ore hills. The ore varies throughout its length, its main point of resemblance being its magnetic property. In its northern extension titanium is distributed in prohibitive quantities. In the south this element is absent. Many mines have been worked in New Jersey in years gone by, but either from the exhaustion of the deposits or from the inferior quality or from the high cost of mining, a large number have ceased operation, so that the amount now produced in the State is only half what was raised in 1880.